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Competency

DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCES DAN LAND RESOURCES

 

  1. Soil Fertility (TSL 320)

Course Nama (Course Code)   :    Soil Fertility (TSL 320)

SKS                                          :    3(3-0)

Offer in                                     :    Semester odd

Prerequisite                               :    Principles of Soil Sciences (TSL 200) or Introduction to Soil Scince (TSL 201)

Course Coordinator                  :    Dr. Ir. Suwarno, M.Sc.

Language                                  :    English

Description of the course         :      Soil Fertility Course is a course which discuss all aspects related to capability of soils to supply essential elements in enough amount and balance for plant growth. Consequently, the discusses comprise all the processes affecting the availabilty the essential elements as well as toxic elements and their transport to the plants. The topics discussed in this course consist of: definition of soil fertility; interaction between soil fertility and other soil sciences and agronomy; the role of formation factors on soil fertilty;growth and growth factors; elements needed by plants;  Basic of soil – plantsinteraction; organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorus, potasium, calsium, magnesium; sulfur, silicon, micro elements; soil acidity and the way to overcome their problem; and aspects of soil fertility in wet lands.

This course triesto correlate the topics discussed with aspect of agriculture practice reality in the field and results of relevance researches.

Learning outcomes                   :      Student capable to: 1) understand the background of potency and problems of soil fertility of each type of soil, characteristic each nutrient in the soil and their sources, and 2) evaluate soil fertility problems and recommend  the overcome way which effective, efficient, and sustainable.

Indicative assessment               :    Mid and and last semesters writing test.

Contact hours                           :  3 hours

 

Reading  :

  1. Leiwakabessy, F. M., U. M. Wahjudin, dan Suwarno. 2003.  Kesuburan Tanah.  Jurusan Tanah, Fakultas Pertanian, IPB.
  2. Tisdale, S. L, W. L. Nelson, and J. D. Beaton. 1985.  Soil Fertility and Fertilizers.  4th ed.  MacMillan Publishing Company, New York.
  3. Prasad, R and J. F. Power. Soil Fertility Management for Sustainable Agriculture.  CRC Press, Boca Raton.
  4. Sanchez, P. A. 1976.  Properties and Management of Soil in the Tropics.  John Wiley and Sons, New York.
  5. Brady, N. C. 1990.  The Nature and Properties of Soils.  10th ed. MacMillan Publishing Company, New York.
  6. Mengel, K. and E. A. Kirkby. 1982.  Principles of Plant Nutrition. 2nd ed. International Potash Institute, Bern.
  7. Werterman, R. L. 1990.  Soil Testing and Plant Analysis.  3rd ed. Soil Sci. Soc. Am., Inc., New York.
  8. Andrew, C. S. and E. J. Kamprath. 1978.  Mineral Nutrition of Legums in Tropical and Subtropical Soils.  CSIRO Publ., Australia.
  9. IRRI. 1965.  The Mineral Nutrition of the Rice Plant.  The Johns Hopkins, Baltimore.
  10. Epstein, E and A. J. Bloom. 2003. Mineral Nutrition of Plants: Principles and Perspectives. Secondt Editions. Sinauer Associates, Inc. Publisher, Sunderland.
  11. Ma, J. F. and E. Takahasi. 2002. Soil, Fertilizer, and Plant Silicon Research in Japan. Elsevier, Amsterdam.

 

 

  1. Soil and water conservation (TSL 331)

 

Course Name (code)             : Soil and water conservation (TSL 331)

SKS                                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered to                              : Semester 6

Pre-requisite                          : Introduction to Soil Sciences (TSL 201)

Course coordinator               : Dr. Suria Tarigan, MSc

Language                               : English (upon request)

Description of the course     :

 

The course activities consists of class lecture and practical exercise.  The course discusses erosion factors, soil and water conservation methods, erosion prediction with USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) and soil conservation farming including tolerable soil erosion concept. In addition, social-econimc factors in soil and water conservation will be further discussed.

 

Learning outcome :

 

  1. Students are able to explain soil physics related to the soil and water conservation, soil and water conservation problems, incuding erosion, degraded lands.
  2. Students are able to explain erosion factors, to predict soil erosion using USLE, to design soil and water conservation techniques.
  3. Students are able to design and to plan conservation farming system for sustainable agriculture.

 

Indicative assesment :

 

Mid&Final term examinations and activities during practical exercises.

 

Contact hours : Mondays (13-16)

 

Reading :

 

  1. Handouts for each lecture topic
  2. Hudson, N. 1971. Soil Conservation. Cornell University Press. NY
  3. Schwab, G.O., Frevert, R.K., Edminster, T.W., and K.K. Barnes. 1981. Soil and water conservation Engineering. John Wiley&Sons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEPARTEMENT OF AGRONOMY AND HORTICULTURE

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Principle of Plant Breeding (AGH 211)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 4 (even semester)

Prerequisites                          : –

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir Trikoesoemaningtyas, MSc

Language                               : Indonesian and English (Both)

 

Description of the course :

This course provides knowledge to the students through couse and practicum to be able to explain the meaning and scope of plant breeding science, crop improvement techniques and selection on self-pollinated plants, cross-pollination and vegetative propagation, utilization of mutation techniques, polyploidy and biotechnology in plant breeding, and also procedure knowledge of releasing and protection of variety

Learning outcomes :

Upon completion of this course students will be able to explain the techniques of crop improvement and selection methods on self-pollinated crops, cross-pollination and vegetative propagation, utilization of mutation techniques, polyploidy and biotechnology in plant breeding as well as procedure of releasing and protection of variety

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in 2

examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm  exam                        : 35 %

Final exam                              : 30 %

Practice                                   : 25 %

Structured Assignment            : 10 %

 

Category of grades are as follows :

Range of Score Grade
X  ? 76 A
71 ?  X < 75,9 AB
66 ?  X < 70,9 B
61 ?  X < 65,9 BC
56 ?  X < 60,9 C
46 ?  X < 55,9 D
X < 46 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture Monday 13.00 – 14.40 WIB

Field Practicum Friday 7.00 – 10.00 WIB

 

Reading :

  1. Chahal, G.S. and S.S. Gosal. 2002. Principles and Procedures of Plant Breeding: Biotechnological and Conventional Approach.  Narosa Publishing, New Delhi p. 604.
  2. Darbeshwar, R. 2000. Plant Breeding. Analysis and Exploitation of Variation. Narosa Publishing, New Delhi. p 701.
  3. Fehr. W. R. 1987. Principles of Cultivar Development. Theory and Technique, Vol 2. Macmillan. London. p 536
  4. Griffith, A.J. F. ; J.H. Miller, D.T.Suzuki, R.C. Lewontin and W.M. Gelhart. 1993. An Introduction to Genetics Analysis.  Freeman and Co. New York.
  5. D.A. Sleeper and J.M Poehlman. 2006. Breeding Field Crops. 5th ed. AVI. Westport. WI.
  6. Stoskopf, N.C. 1993. Plant Breeding : Theory and Practice. Westview Press , Boulder. p 531

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Principle of Horticulture (AGH 240)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 4 (even semester)

Prerequisites                          : Principle of Agronomy (AGH 200)

Course Coordinator              : Ir Winarso D Widodo, Phd, MS

Language                               : Indonesian and English (Both)

 

Description of the course :

This lecture discusses the basic understanding and scope of horticulture,  characteristics of crop and horticultural cultivation, horticulture cultivation system in Indonesia, horticultural development of the world and Indonesia and its influencing factors, as well as horticultural production technologies that include greenhouses, media and pots, hydroponics and organic farming, selecting excellence plant materials, land preparation and planting, fertilizing, irrigation and fertigation, pruning, flowering arrangements and management of flowers and fruit, harvest and post-harvest, and the intensification of the garden. Aspects of horticultural techniques in the form of intensive cultivation of horticultural crops will be intensifyin practicum. To attend this lecture, students must have the basic competence of Agronomy.

Learning outcomes :

Students are expected to be able to explain the characteristics of plants and technology of horticultural cultivation

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in

examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm exam                         : 30%

Final exam                              : 30%

Structured assignment             : 10%

Skill level and participation     : 5%
Weekly Practicum Report       :10%
Final Practicum Report           : 15%

 

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
X  ? 76 A
71 ?  X < 75,9 AB
66 ?  X < 70,9 B
61 ?  X < 65,9 BC
56 ?  X < 60,9 C
46 ?  X < 55,9 D
X < 46 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture Monday 15.00 – 16.40 WIB

Field Practicum can be chosen : Monday until Thursday 7.00-10.00WIB

Reading :

Poerwanto, R. dan A. D. Susila. 2014. Seri I Hortikultura Tropika: Teknologi Hortikultura. IPB Press, Bogor. 420 hal

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Seed Science and Technology (AGH 250)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 3 (odd semester)

Prerequisites                          : –

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir Eny Widajati, MS

Language                               : Indonesian and English (Both)

 

Description of the course :

This courses discuss the importantace of quality seeds in crop production, seed formation and development, metabolism during seed germination, and seed dormancy, definition of seed viability and seed quality testing, procurement and monitoring of quality seeds that include production and certification, processing and storage), seed pest and diseases, and development of seed industry in Indonesia.

Learning outcomes :

after completing this course, students will have skill and knowledge to produce, process and store good quality seeds/planting material in terms of genetics, physiology, and pathology, and have ability to conduct a proper seed quality testing.

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm exam                         : 30%

Final exam                              : 30%

Structured assignment             : 10%

Final Practicum Report           : 30%

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture

Practicum

Readings :

  1. Bewley, J.D. and M. Black.   Seed Physiology of Development and Germination.  Plenum Press. New York. 445 p
  2. Copeland , L.O. and M.B. McDonald. 1995. Principles of Seed Science and Technology. Chapman and Hall Press. New York. 409 p.
  3. Departemen Pertanian. 1977. Peraturan Perundangan Perbenihan Tanaman Pangan.
  4. Departemen Pertanian. 2006. Pedoman Laboratorium Pengujian Mutu Benih Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura.
  5. Direktorat Jendral Tanaman Pangan. 2005. Evaluasi Kecambah. BPMBTPH. Cimanggis
  6. Dirjen Hortikultura. 2007. Sertifikasi Benih Tanaman Sayuran.
  7. Dirjen Tanaman Pangan. 2009.Persyaratan dan Tatacara sertifikasi benih bina tanaman pangan.
  8. Direkorat Jenderal Tanaman Pangan Direktorat Perbenihan. 2005. Metode dan Prosedur Pengujian Kesehatan Benih Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura. Balai Pengembangan Mutu Benih Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura, Cimanggis, Depok
  9. Esau, K. 1977. Anatomy of Seed Plants
  10. Faegri, K and van der Pijl, L. 1979. The Principles of Pollination Ecology
    Galston, AW. 1980. The Life of The Green Plant. Third Edition.Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
  11. Gifford, EM and Foster, AS. 1988. Morphology and Evolution of Vascular Plant.
    Third Edition. WH Freeman & Co. NY
  12. Gregg, B.R., A.G. Law, S.S.Virdi, J.S. Balis. 1970. Seed Processing. Avion Printers, New Delhi 350 p.
  13. Hampton dan TeKrony .1995. Handbook of Vigour Test Method. The ISTA. Switzerland
  14. Hartmann, H.T. D.E. Kester and F.T.Davies. 1990. Plant propagation, Principles and Practices. Printice –Hall. Inc 2010.  International Rules for Seed Testing.  ISTA. Switzerland.
  15. Jann and R.R Amen. 1977. What Is Germination. In Khan (ed.) The Physiology and Biochemistry of Seed Dormancy and Germination.
  16. Johri, BM (ed.). 1984. Embryology of Angiosperms. Springer-Verlag. Berlin Heidelberg
  17. Knox, RB. 1984. The Pollen Grain. In: Johri, BM (ed.) Embryology of Angiosperms. Springer-Verlag. Berlin Heidelberg
  18. Mayer, A.M. and P. Mayber. 1982. The Germination of Seed. Pergamon Press Ltd. Oxford. New York.
  19. Mauseth, JD. 1991. Botany. An Introduction to Plant Biology)
  20. Mugnisyah, W.Q. dan A. Setiawan. 1990. Pengantar Produksi Benih. Rajawali Pres.Jakarta
  21. Priestley, D.A.   Seed Aging.  Cornel University Press.Ithaca.
  22. Sadjad, S. 1993. Dari Benih kepada Benih. Jakarta.
  23. Sadjad, S., E. Murniati dan S. Ilyas. 1999. Parameter Pengujian Vigor Benih. Grasindo. Jakarta
  24. Sadjad, S. 2006. Benih yang membawa dan dibawa perubahan.  IPB Pres. Bogor
  25. Sadjad, S., F.C. Suwarno dan S. Hadi. Tiga decade berindustri benih di Indonesia. Jakarta
  26. Sedgley, M and Griffin, AR. 1989. Sexual Reproduction of Tree Crops
  27. D, 1999. Kebijaksanaan Pembangunan perbenihan tanaman pangan dan hortikultura. Dirjen Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura. Jakarta
  28. Taliroso, D. 2008. Deteksi status vigor benih kedelai (Glycine max Merr) melalui Metoda uji daya hantar listrik. Tesis Sekolah Pascasarjana, IPB
  29. Vidaver, W. 1977. Light and Seed Germination. In Khan (ed.) The Physiology and Biochemistry of Seed Dormancy and Germination.
  30. http://www.photomacrogram.net/forum/viewtopic.php

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Fundamental of Plant Biotechnology (AGH 330)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 5 (odd semester)

Prerequisites                          : –

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir Ni Made Armini Wiendi, MS

Language                               : Indonesian and English (Both)

 

Description of the course :

 

This course gives students about the concept of fundamental plant biotechnology and to provide examples of how these principles are put into operation, in in vitro plant propagation technique for plant production seedlings, in vitro breeeding for incresing genetic diversity and selection to become a new variety, and some athers technique in biotechnology.

 

Learning outcomes :

General Learning Outcome

After completing this subject, the student are able to explain the concept and give an example of plant biotechnology and have skill in biotechnology technique. Additionally, they are able to choose a sspecific technique in biotechnology to be applied for crops, plantation and horticultural plants.

 

Specific Learning Outcome

After completing this course, the students will be able to explain about concept and technique of fundamental plant biotechnology, in vitro plant propagation via organogenesis and embryogenesis, gene expresstion and in vitro plant breeding, in vitro secondary metabolites production, and in vitro plant preservation

Indicative assessment  :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm exam : 35%

Final exam         : 35%

Practice              : 30% .

 

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture

Practicum can be chosen :

 

Readings :

  1. Wattimena GA et al. 2011. Biotechnology in Plant Breeding.  IPB Press, ID
  2. Wattimena GA et al.   Plant Biotecnology.  IPB Press, ID
  3. Chrispeels, MJ and David ES. 2003. Plants Genes, and Crop Biotechnology. 2ed. Jone and Bartlett Pub., London
  4. Chawla HS.    Introduction to Plant Biotechnology.  Science Publishers, Inc. USA.
  5. Islam, A S.   In Vitro Culture, Transformation and Molecular Markers for Crop Improvement.  Science Publishers, Inc.  USA
  6. Kozai T., Afreen, F. And Zobayed SMA. Photoautotrophic (sugar- free medium) Micropropagation and Transplant Production System. Springer, The Netherland
  7. Trigiano RN and Gray D.   Plant Tissue Culture, Development, and Biotechnology.  CRC Press, USA
  8. Jain SM, Brar DS, Ahloowalla, BS.   Somaclonal Variation and Induced Mutations in Crop Improvement.  Kluwer Academic Publisher.  USA
  9. Course Name (Course Code): Plant Propagation (AGH 331)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 6 (even semester)

Prerequisites                          : –

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir Darda Effendi, MS

Language                               : Indonesian and English (Both)

 

Description of the course :

 

This lecture discusses the general concept of plant propagation through vegetative and generative organs. Vegetatively covered both conventional breedingby tissue culture techniques along with aspects of their underlying biological and physiological, objectives, applications, advantages and disadvantages. The subject matter is emphasized on conventional vegetative propagation techniques (cuttings, grafts, grafting and pasting), breeding with plant-specific organs, apomiktics and tissue culture techniques (organogenesis, embryogenesis), laboratory facilities, aseptic techniques, tissue culture media and substances Growth regulators, factors affecting organogenesis and embryogenesis, and production of quality plant material (disease-free). Discussion in generative propagation will be include pollination, seed formation, seed development, certified seed production, seed processing and storage.
Practicum: students are directed to mastery of vegetative propagation techniques both conventionally and tissue culture techniques.

 

Learning outcomes :

After following this course, students can explain the biological and physiological aspects of conventional plant breeding and tissue culture, the reasons and objectives, advantages and disadvantages, and able to design a tissue culture laboratory and perform important processes in tissue culture techniques of certain plants.

 

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm  exam  : 35%

Final exam         : 35%

Practice              : 30% .

 

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture Thursday 13.00 – 14.40 WIB

Field Practicum Tuesday 7.00 – 10.00 WIB

Readings  :

 

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Estate Plantation (AGH 341)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 6(even semester)

Prerequisites                          : Principle of Agronomy (AGH 200)

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir Supijatno, MS.

Language                               : Indonesia and English (both)

 

Description of the course :

 

This course explains the origin, economic value, botanical and ekofisiology ofthe major plantation crops such ascoconut, oil palm and rubber,cultivation and techniques from plant material procurement, land preparation, planting, maintenance, harvesting and primary processing of palm oil, coconut and rubber.

Learning outcomes :

  1. Ability to explain plantation development system and criteria of Plantation Crops (oil palm, rubber and coconut)
  2. Knowing the origin, botanical nature and ecophysiology of plantation crops in relation to the proper management of plantation crops
  3. Knowing the planning of plantation business development by utilizing natural resources optimally
  4. Knowing the application of plantation cultivation techniques that are environmentally sound to get maximum production

 

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm/first  exam    : 25 %

Second exam               : 25

Third/Final exam        : 25 %

Practice                       : 25% , consist of :

Skills and participation: 15 %

Practicum Report        : 5 %

Practicum exam           : 5%

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture 13.00 – 14.40 WIB

Field Practicum 7.00 – 10.00 WIB

 

Readings :

 

 

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Vegetable Crops (AGH 342)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 6 (even semester)

Prerequisites                          : Principle of Horticulture (AGH 240) or at least

                                                Principle of Agronomy (AGH200)

Course Coordinator              : Prof Dr Ir Anas D. Susila, MSc

Language                               : English

 

Description of the course :

 

This lecture discusses comprehensively the major vegetable commodities and exotic vegetables cultivated in Indonesia and in the world, linked to the technological aspects of crop production (nurseries, cropping systems, fertilizing, irrigation, weed control, pest and disease control, harvesting), physiology, ecology, botany, seedling and breeding, post harvest, and marketing. The technical aspects of vegetable production, as well as production planning in management of vegetable commodity will be directed to be conducted and analyzed by students in practicum.

 

Learning outcomes :

Students are able to manage vegetable production business by applying plant production management to produce maximum production with excellent quality in sustainable agriculture system.

Students possess the knowledge to identify vegetable crop characteristics and genetic potential and utilization.

Students master the science and technology of production and post-harvest primary vegetable crops.

Students are able to evaluate the vegetable production process and follow-up

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm  exam            : 30%

Final exam                  : 30%

Structured assignment : 15 %

Practice                       : 35%, consist of,

Quiz                             : 5 %

Skills and participation: 5 %

Practicum Report        : 15 %

Oral Presentation        : 10%

 

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture Wednesday 13.00 – 14.40 WIB

Field Practicum Wednesday 7.00 – 10.00 WIB

Readings :

 

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Ornamental Plant and Floriculture (AGH 343)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 6 (even semester)

Prerequisites                          : Principle of Horticulture (AGH 240) or at least

                                                Principle of Agronomy (AGH200)

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir Dewi Sukma, MS

Language                               : English

 

 

 

 

Description of the course :

This course gives some descriptions of ornamental plants/cut flower, plant culture technique,post harvest handling, a brief review for ornamental plant breeding and floriculture bussiness

 

Learning outcomes :

General Learning Outcome

After completing this subject, the students will understand the scope of floriculture, ornamentalplant culture technique, ornamental plant breeding, and some aspects of floriculture bussiness.

 

Specific Learning Outcome

After completing this subject, student will be able to explain :

– Definition of floriculture and group of commodities

– Culture technique for some important ornamental plants/cut flower : orchids, chrysanthemum,roses, carnation, many kinds of bedding plants, pot plants, post harvest handling, breeding of ornamental plants and aspects of floriculture bussiness/enterpreneur.

 

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm  exam            : 35 %

Final exam                  : 35 %

Practice                       : 30%

 

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture Monday 13.00 – 14.40 WIB

Field Practicum Monday 7.00 – 10.00 WIB

Readings :

  1. Dole, J.M. Wilkins H.F. Floriculture. Principles and Species. Prentice Hall. New Jersey.
  2. Elliot, J. (Ed.). 1998. Orchids Growing in The Tropics. Orchids Society of South

East Asia. Singapore. 207p.

  1. Ingels, J.E. 1994. Ornamental Horticulture. Delmar Publisher. New York. 554p.
  2. Larson, R.A. (Ed). 1980. Introduction to Floriculture. Academic Press. New

York.

  1. Longman, D. 1982. The care of House Plants. Book Club Associates.

London.196p

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Seed Production  and  Processing  (AGH 350)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 6 (even semester)

Prerequisites                          : Seed Science and Technology (AGH 250)

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir A. Qadir, MS.

Language                               : Indonesia and English (both)

 

Description of the course :

 

The Coursesdiscussesthe notionof seeds, seed production management systems, agronomic and genetic principles in seed production, production ofnon-hybridseeds, the production of hybrid crop seeds, seed processing, the mechanism of the seed processing machine, and management of seed processing unit.

 

Learning outcomes :

After following this course, students can explain about the production and processing of non-hybrid and hybrid seeds, as well as basic management of a seed processing unit.

 

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm exam             : 30 %

Final exam                  : 30 %

Practice                       : 30%

Structured Assignment : 10%

 

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

            Contact Hours :

Course lecture 13.00 – 14.40 WIB

Field Practicum 7.00 – 10.00 WIB

 

Readings :

  1. Direktorat Jenderal Tanaman Pangan. 1991. Petunjuk Pengawas Benih.
  2. George, R. A. T. 1985. Vegetable Seed Production.
  3. Kelly, A. F. 1988. Seed Production of Agricultural Crop.
  4. Mugnisjah, W. Q., dan A. Setiawan. 1996. Pengantar Produksi Benih.
  5. Produksi Padi dan Palawija. Sub Dir Pengawasan Mutu dan Sertifikasi Benih.
  6. Sadjad, S. 1993. Dari Benih Kepada Benih.
  7. Undang-undang Republik Indonesia Nomor 12 Tahun 1992.
  8. Wirawan, B. Dan S. Wahyuni. 2002. Memproduksi Benih Bersertifikat : Padi, Jagung, Kedelai.
  9. Mohammad Lassim, M. 1987. Seed Processing Training at Institut Pertanian Bogor. IPB. Bogor.
  10. Desai, B. B., P. M. Kotecha, and D. K. Salunkhe. 1997. Seeds Handbook.

 

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Post Harvest of agricultural Crops (AGH 440)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 7 (odd semester)

Prerequisites                          : –

Course Coordinator              : Dr Ir Sugiyanta, MSi.

Language                               : Indonesia and English (both)

 

Description of the course      :

This course discusses the basic of post-harvest and handling techniques of agricultural products, covering the boundary and scope of agricultural post-harvest. Cleaning, sorting and grading, drying, milling (size reduction), quality management, packing and storage. Postharvest handling techniques of commodities include physicochemical properties of materials and techniques of postharvest handling of specific commodities (food, horticulture and plantation).

Practicum will be more directed students on practical knowledge and skill in  postharvest handling techniques of some crops especially in determining yield maturity, sorting, drying, milling and rendement, and analysis of some components of quality of agricultural product.

 

Learning outcomes :

After completing this course students will be able to undertake post-harvest handling techniques of some agricultural crops

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm  exam            : 35 %

Final exam                  : 35 %

Practice                       : 30%

 

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture TuesdayWIB

Practicum can be chosen : Thursday 10.00 – 14.00 WIB, or

Thursday 13.00 – 16.00

Readings :

 

  1. Course Name (Course Code): Seed Storage and Testing (AGH 450)

Credits (SKS)                        : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                               : Semester 7 (odd semester)

Prerequisites                          : Seed Science and Technology (AGH 250)

Course Coordinator              : Prof Dr Ir Satryas Ilyas, MSc.

Language                               : English (both)

 

Description of the course :

 

This lecture discusses: (1) the quality of the seed and the factors that influence it; (2) seed testing procedures and standards; (3) seed sampling procedures; (4) various types of physical, physiological and pathological seed quality testing; (5) the purpose of storage is attributed to the characteristics of the seed; (6) the factors affecting the storability and control; (7) estimation of qualitative and quantitative seed saving; (8) seed storage techniques; And (9) seed quality control. The practicum material includes various techniques of seed quality testing and seed storage.

 

 

 

Learning outcomes :

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe standards, procedures and methods of seed quality testing, as well as control the environmental factors to ensure seed quality.

 

Indicative assessment :

Students performance will be graded based on his/her achievements in examinations and some assignments as follows:

Midterm  exam            : 30 %

Final exam                  : 40 %

Practice                       : 30% , consist of :

Quiz                             : 5 %

Skills and participation: 5 %

Practicum Report        : 10 %

Practicum exam           : 10 %

Category of grades are as follows :

 

Range of Score Grade
?80 A
75? x?79.9 AB
70? x?74.9 B
65? x?69.9 BC
60? x?64.9 C
55? x?59.9 CD
50? x?59.9 D
<50 E

 

Contact Hours :

Course lecture Monday 13.00 – 14.40 WIB

Field Practicum Friday 7.00 – 10.00 WIB

 

Readings :

1.     [AOSA] Association of Official Seed Analysts. 1983. Seed Vigor Testing Handbook. No. 32.
2.     Chin, H. F and E. H. Robert. 1980. Recalcitrant Crop Seeds. Tropical Press Sdn. Bhd. 152p.
3.     Copeland, L.O. and M.B. McDonald. 2004. Principles of Seed Science and Technology. 4th Ed. Chapman & Hall.
4.     Farrant, J. M., N. W.  Pammenter, and P. Berjak. 1988. Recalcitrance-a current assessment. Seed Sci & Technol., 16, 155-166.
5.     Grabe., D. F.  1978. The GADA Test for Seed Storability, Seed Technology Laboratory, Mississippi. 14p.

6.     Ilyas, S. dan E. Widajati. 2015. Teknik dan Prosedur Pengujian Mutu Benih Tanaman Pangan. 2015. IPB Press.

7.     Ilyas, S. 2004.  Pentingnya Mutu Benih.  Makalah pada Pelatihan Petugas Pengambil Contoh Benih Tanaman Pangan dan Horticultura.  Dirjen Bina Produksi Tanaman Pangan, Deptan.  Ciawi, 28 Juni – 1 Juli 2004.

8.     [ISTA] International Seed Testing Association. 2014. International Rules for Seed Testing.
9.     Justice, O. L and L. N. Bass. 1990. Prinsip dan Praktek Penyimpanan Benih. Terjemahan. Penerbit CV. Rajawali. 446p.
10.  Mamicpic, N. G. 1988. Seed Storage. Seed Analysis and Production Lab., Institut Pertanian Bogor. Bogor. 260p.
11.  Roberts, E. H. 1972. Seed Viability. Chapman and Hall. London. 440p.
12.  Sadjad, S. 1994. Kuantifikasi Metabolisme Benih. PT. Gramedia Widiasarana, Jakarta.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PROTECTION

 

  1. Principles of Crop Protection (PTN 200)

 

Course Name (Course Code: Principles of Crop Protection (PTN 200)

Credit                                     :  3 (2 for lecture and 1 for laboratory exercises)

Semester                                 :  4

Prerequisite                            :   –

Instructor                              :  Teaching Team

Number of Students             :   360, divided into five classes

 

The Importance of Course :

After completing this course, the students will acquire knowledge in the following aspects:

  • the importance of plant pests and diseases;
  • theory of pests incidence, animals that disturb or cause damages on plant, factors affecting pest lives, and pest control methods;
  • various plant pathogen, plant disease symptomatology, factors causing plant diseases, infection mechanism, effect of pathogen on plant physiology, and mechanism of plant resistance against pathogen, plant disease cycle, epidemiology, and environmental factors affecting plant disease
  • principles of plant disease management
  • integrated management of plant pests and diseases

 

Course Description :

  • This course is obligatory course for students majoring agriculture (except plant protection), and for student taking minor of plant protection
  • This course is offered to give the students about basic knowledge of plant protection.
  • This course discusses the importance of plant pests, theory of pest incidence, the concept of economic threshold and economic injury level, introduction morphology and biology of important insects, mites, mollusks and rodents inhabits crops, factors affecting pests life, concept and method of pest management.
  • This course also discusses history, development, definition, and terminology of phytopathology, disease symptom, method of observation and survey of plant diseases, Koch’s Postulate, abiotic and biotic factors cause plant diseases, infection mechanism, effect of pathogen on plant physiology, mechanism of plant resistance against pathogen, disease cycle, epidemiology, pathogen survival, effect of environmental factors on plant diseases, and disease management.

 

General Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the students will be able to identify plant pest and disease problems and develop their management on the field

Organization of Course Topics                           

The schematic sequence of course topics delivery is illustrated on the next page.

 

Explaining and giving examples of  infection mechanism, effect of pathogen on plant physiology, and mechanism of plant resistance against pathogen

 

 

Explaining and giving examples of history, development and terminology of phytopathology

 

Explaining and giving examples of symptomatology

 

 

Explaining and giving examples of plant disease cycle, epidemiology, and environmental factors

 

 

Explaining and giving examples of scientific factors cause plant diseases

 

 

Explaining and giving examples of concept and methods of plant disease management

 

 

Explaining and giving examples of pest control methods

 

 

Explaining and giving examples of animals disturbing or causing damages on plant
Explaining the importance of plant pests, theory of pest incidence, economic threshold, and economic injury level
Explaining and giving examples of factors affecting pest lives
GLO:  After completing this course, the students will be able to identify plant pest and disease problems and develop their management on the field

 

Organization of Course Topics

 

 

Specific Learning Outcomes

No. Specific Learning Outcome Topic Subtopic Time Estimation References
1. After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the importance of plant pests, theory of pest incidence, economic threshold, and economic injury level. Introduction to plant pests. 1.1    Introduction: course contract

1.2    The importance of plant pests

1.3    Theory of pest incidence

1.4    Economic threshold and economic injury level

  5  minutes

30 minutes

35 minutes

30 minutes

1, 2, 3, 4
2 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of animals disturbing or causing damages on plant. Animals dis-turbing or cau-sing damages on plant 2.1   Introduction to insects

2.2   Insects mouthparts

2.3   Insects development

2.4   Introduction to ordo and family of important insects

2.5   Mites, molusc and rats

2.6   Life cycles of important plant pests

10 minutes

30 minutes

20 minutes

100 minutes

 

20 minutes

20 minutes

1, 2, 3, 4
3 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of factors affecting pest lives Factors affec-ting pest lives 3.1    Internal factors

3.2    External (environmental) factors

30 minutes

70 minutes

 

1, 2, 3, 4
4 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of pest control methods Pest control methods 4.1    Regulation

4.2    Cultivation pratices

4.3    Sanitation

4.4    Physical mechanic

4.5    Biological agents

4.6    Chemical

4.7    Integrated pest management

20 minutes

50 minutes

20 minutes

50 minutes

50 minutes

50 minutes

60 minutes

1, 2, 3, 4
5 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of history, development and terminology of phytopathology Introduction to phyto-pathology 5.1    History and development of phytopathology

5.2    Definition and terminology of phytopathology

50 minutes

 

50 minutes

5, 6
6 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of symptomatology Symptomatology 6.1  External and internal symptom

6.2  Observation and survey

6.3  Koch Postulate

40 minutes

30 minutes

30 minutes

5, 6

 

 

 

No. Specific Learning Outcome Topic Subtopic Time Estimation References
7 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of factors causing plant diseases Factors causing plant diseases 7.1  Abiotic factors

7.2  Biotic factors:

Virus,

Bacteria,

Fungi,

Nematode

20 minutes

 

20 minutes

20 minutes

20 minutes

20 minutes

5, 6
8 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of infection mechanism, effect of pathogen on plant physiology, and mechanism of plant resistance against pathogen Infection me-chanism, effect of pathogen on plant physiolo-gy, and mecha-nism of plant resistance aga-inst pathogen 8.1.   Infection mechanism

8.2.   Effect of pathogen on plant

physiology

8.3.   Mechanism of plant resistance

against pathogen

30 minutes

40 minutes

 

30 minutes

5, 6
9 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of plant disease cycle, epidemiology, and environmental factors Plant disease cycle, epidemi-ology, and environmental factors 9.1.  Plant disease cycle

9.2.  Effects of environmental

factors on plant disease

9.3.  Epidemiology

9.4.  Pathogen survival

25 minutes

25 minutes

 

25 minutes

25 minutes

5, 6
10 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain and give examples of concept and methods of plant disease management Concept and methods of plant disease management 10.1. Concept of plant disease

management

10.2. Methods of plant disease

management: Regulation,

Cultivation pratices, Biological agents, Chemical compound, Integrated pest management

20 minutes

 

180 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Major References :

  1. Metcalf and Luckman. 1975.  Introduction to Insect Pest Management.
  2. Metcalf and Flint. 1962.  Destructive and Useful Insects.
  3. Kalshoven LGE. 1981.  Pests of Crops in Indonesia.
  4. NAS. 1969.  Principles of Plant and Animal Pest Control.  Volume 3 : Insect Pest Management and Control.
  5. Agrios GN. 1997.  Plant Pathology.  New York:  Academic Press.
  6. Crop Protection Compendium (CPC). 2003.  CMI

 

Teaching-Learning Strategy  :

In fourteen class meetings, delivery of course topics will be carried out through face-to-face lectures in a class which will be enriched with relevant examples and followed by short discussion.  In laboratory works, each student observes pest (insects and vertebrates) and disease or pathogen specimens and their symptoms.

 

Assignments                    :

To get a final grade point from this course, each student is required to take two examinations of lecture section, known as midterm and final exams.  Besides, in laboratory exercises section, each student also has to take several quizzes and two laboratory exercise exams (pest and disease sub sections).

 

Evaluation of Student’s Performance:

 

  • Weighting of student’s grade components
Component Weight (%)
Mid-semester exam 35
Final exam 35
Laboratory works 30

 

  • Category of grading
    Range of scores Grade
x (score) ³ 80 A
70 £ x < 80 B
60 £ x < 70 C
50 £ x < 60 D
x < 50 E

 

 

Schedule of Class Meeting (Lecture)

 

Week 1 Introduction: course contract; The importance of plant pests; Theory of pest incidence; Economic threshold and economic injury level
Week 2 Introduction to insects; Insects mouthparts; Insects development; Introduction to ordo and family of important insects
Week 3 Introduction to ordo and family of important insects; Mites, molusc and rats; Life cycles of important plant pests
Week 4 Factors affecting pest lives: Internal factors and

External (environmental) factors;

Week 5 Pest control methods: Regulation; Cultivation pratices; Sanitation
Week 6 Pest control methods: Physical mechanic; Biological agents
Week 7

Pest control methods: Chemical; Integrated pest management

Week 8 MIDTERM EXAM
Week 9

Introduction to phytopathology: History and development of phytopathology; Definition and terminology of phytopathology

Week 10

Symptomatology: External and internal symptom; Observation and survey; Koch Postulate

Week 11 Factors causing plant diseases: Abiotic factors; Biotic factors (Virus, Bacteria, Fungi, and Nematode)
Week 12 Infection mechanism: Effect of pathogen on plant physiology; Mechanism of plant resistance against pathogen
Week 13 Plant disease cycle:  Effects of environmental factors on plant disease; Epidemiology; Pathogen survival
Week 14, 15 Concept of plant disease management; Methods of plant disease management: Regulation, Cultivation pratices, Biological agents, Chemical compound, Integrated pest management
Week 16

FINAL EXAM

 

 

  1. General Entomology (PTN 211)

 

Credit                            :  4 (2 for lecture and 2 for laboratory exercises)

Semester                        :  3

Prerequisite                   :  Biology

Instructors                    :  Purnama Hidayat, Nina Maryana, and Dewi Sartiami

Number of Students    :  80 students

 

The Importance of Course :

General entomology is a fundamental course for students in the Department of Plant Protection, since many advanced courses require entomology as the basic.

 

Course Description :

This course is required for students who are interested in studying insects as a basic science as well as an applied science.  In this course,  various topics will be discussed regarding the role of insects in human life, insect anatomy, morphology, general biology, ecology, evolution and classification.  Techniques for insect collection, preservation, and identification will also be discussed.  Implementation of the knowledge about insects for beneficial purposes will be illustrated at the end of the course.

 

General Learning Outcomes :

After completing this course, students will be able to explain the role of insects in human life, insect anatomy, morphology, evolution and classification, and application of entomology in various aspects, especially in the field of agriculture.  Students should be able to identify insects orders and families.

Organization of Course Topics :

To achieve the general learning outcomes, there will be nine main topics delivered in this course.  The schematic sequence of the nine topics delivery is illustrated on the next page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After completing this course, students will be able to explain the role of insects in human life, insect anatomy, morphology, evolution and classification, and application of entomology in various aspects, especially in the field of agriculture.  Students should be able to identify insects orders and families.

 

 

 

 

9  Applied entomology
6  General biology, behaviour, ecology & biogeography
7  Evolution, systematics, phylogeny of insects
5  Sensory mechanism, light & sound production, movement
4  Reproduction system & growth development
3 General anatomy & digestion system, blood circulation, respiration, secretion system
1  The role of insects in human life
2 Techniques for insect collection, and preservation
8  Taxonomy, identification, specific characters of the most important insects’ order and families

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specific Learning Outcomes :

After attending the sessions of this course, students will be able to explain  :

  • The role of insects in human life
  • General anatomy & digestion system, blood circulation, respiration, secretion system
  • Reproduction system & growth development
  • Sensory mechanism, light & sound production, movement
  • General biology, behaviour, ecology & biogeography
  • Evolution, systematics, phylogeny of insects
  • Taxonomy, identification, specific characters of the most important insects’ order and families
  • Applied entomology in various aspects, especially in agriculture
  • Techniques for insect collection, and preservation

 

Major References :

 

Borror, D.J., Triplehorn, C.A., and Johson, N.F.  1996.  Pengenalan Pelajaran SERANGGA ( Terjemahan dari An Introduction toThe Study of Insects). Edisi keenam.  Gadjah Mada University Press. Yogyakarta. 1083 hal.

Nauman, I.D.  1994.  Systematic and Applied Entomology:  An Introduction.  Melbourne University Press. Victoria.  484 hal.

Romoser, W.S.  1981.  The Science of Entomology.  Second Edition.  MacMillan Publishing Co.  Inc.  New York.  575 hal.

Uys, V.M. and Urban, R.P.  1996.  How To Collect and Preserve Insects and Arachnids.  Plant Protection Research Institute.  Pretoria.  73 hal.

 

Teaching-Learning Strategy :

 

Course subjects will be delivered through interactive lectures format combining face to face lecture in class, active discussion, demonstration in front of the class, and the use of multi-media teaching materials.  Students are always encouraged to give their opinion or ask questions at any convenience time.

Laboratory works and practices are given to develop students’ skill and knowledge especially for collecting and preserving insect specimens, and also insects identification.

 

Assignments :

 

  • Review presentation before the class
    • The class is divided into several groups, each group consists of 5 students
    • Each group will present lecture review of previous week, started at the first week.
    • Review presentation is prior lecture for about 20 minutes

–    Insect collection and preservation

  • Each student must prepare insect collection consists of
    • 15 orders
    • 50 families
    • Maximum of immature: 5
  • Insect collection must be submitted in the last day of laboratory work
  • Field trip report
  • Article searching in internet
  • Textbook reading

Evaluation of Student’s Performance (Grading) :

 

Student’s performance was graded based on his/her achievement on examinations and assignments desribed above.  Weighting of student’s grade components and category of grading ares as followed :

  • Weighting of student’s grade components :
Components Weight (%)
Midterm examination 20
Final examination 20
Quizzes 5
Laboratory examination 30
Other assignment 5
Insect collection and preservation 20

 

  • Category of grading :
Range of scores Grade
x  (score) > 85 A
75 < x < 85 B
60 < x < 75 C
50 < x < 60 D
X < 50 E

 

Schedule of Class Meeting (Lecture)

Week 1 Importance of insects in human life ; Review on the status of entomology as a science  (100 min)
Week 2 Techniques for insects’ collection and preservation :  methods and tools required, labeling, identification, storing.  (100 min)
Week 3 Anatomy and function :  integument and external exoskeleton, digestion system (100 min)
Week 4 Blood circulation system, respiration, and secretory system (100 min)
Week 5

Reproduction and development : reproduction system, embryogenesis, growth (100 min)

Week 6

Sensory mechanism, light and sound production, movement (100 min)

Week 7

Biology, behaviour, ecology, and biogeography (100 min)

Week 8 MIDTERM EXAM
Week 9

Evolution, Systematics, and Phylogeny (100 min)

Week 10

Classification and specific characters :  Apterygota & Pterygota; Superorder Orthopteroidea (100 min)

Week 11 Classification and specific characters :  Superorder Hemipteroidea (100 min).
Week 12 Classification and specific characters :  Superorder Neuropteroidea and Hymenopteroidea (100 min).
Week 13 Classification and specific characters :  Superorder Mecopteroidea (100 min)
Week 14 Applied entomology :  agriculture, health, environment conservation (100 min)
Week 15

Review class (100 min).

Week 16

FINAL EXAM

 

Schedule for laboratory practices

 

Week 1 Introduction to Arthropoda
Week 2 External anatomy
Week 3, 4 Internal anatomy
Week 5 Insects development and metamorphosis
Week 6 Acarinae
Week 7 Laboratory exam (1); Apterygota, Pterygota
Week 8, 9 Orthopteroidea
Week 10 Hemipteroidea
Week 11 Neuropteroidea
Week 12 Hymenopteroidea
Week 13, 14 Mecopteroidea
Week 15 Laboratory exam (2)

 

  1. Pests and Diseases of Perennial Crops (PTN 303)

Credit                        : 3 (2 for lecture and 1 for laboratory exercises)

Semester                    : 6

Prerequisite               : PTN 212 and PTN 222, or PTN 200

Instructors                : Nina Maryana, Dhamayanti Adhidarma, Supramana, and Ruly Anwar

Number of Students : 80 students

 

The Importance of Course

This course will give a basic knowledge to students in managing pests and diseases of perennial crops.

 

Course Description

This course describes the important pests and diseases of perennial crops consisting of coconut and other Palmae, cacao, coffee, rubber, orange, tea, medicinal and spice plants (clove, pepper, nutmeg, etc.).

 

General Learning Outcomes

After completing the course, students will be able to explain phenology of perrenial crops and its relation with pests and diseases, damage and control.

 

Organization of Course Topics

The topics of this course will be delivered following the schematic sequence as described on the next page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Organization of Course Topics

 

Introduction to pests and diseases of perennial crops
Medicinal and spice plant phenology, pest,s  damage, and control
Tea plant phenology, orange pests, damage, and control
Ruber plant phenology, rubber pests, damage, and control
Orange plant phenology, orange pests, damage, and control
Coffee plant phenology, coffee pests, damage, and control
Cacao plant phonology, cacao pest,  damage, and control
Coconut plant phenology coconut diseases, damage, and control
General Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, students will be able to explain phenology of perennial crops and its relation with pests and diseases, damage, and control

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medicinal and spice plant phenology, pests, pest damage, and control
Tea plant phenology, tea diseases, damage and control
Ruber plant phenology, ruber diseases, damage and control
Orange plant phenology, orange disesases, damage and control
Coffee plant phenology, coffee diseases, damage and control

 


 

Specific Learning Outcomes

No. Specific Learning Outcome Topics Subtopics Time Estimation References
1 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of coconut plant phenology,  coconut pests, pest damages, and pest controls. Relationship among coconut plant phenology, coconut pests, pest damage, and pest control. ·     Coconut and other Palmae plant phenology

·     Coconut pest and pest damage

·     Coconut pest control

 

30 minutes

 

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

 
2 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of cacao plant phenology, cacao pests, pest damages and pest controls. Cacao plant phenology, pests, pest damage and pest control. ·     Cacao plant phenology

·     Cacao pest and pest damage

·     Cacao pest control

30 minutes

40 minutes

30 minutes

 
3 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of coffee plant phenology, coffee pests, pests damages, and pest controls. Coffee plant phenology, coffee pests, pest damage and pest control. ·     Coffee plant phenology

·     Coffee pest and pest damage

·     Coffee pest control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

40 minutes

 

4

After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of rubber plant phenology, rubber pests, pest damages and pest controls. Rubber plant phenology, rubber pests, pest damage and pest control. ·    Rubber plant phenology

·    Rubber pest and pest damage

·    Rubber pest control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

5 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of orange plant phenology,  orange pests, pest damages and pest controls. Orange plant phenology, orange pests, pest damage and pest control. ·    Orange plant phenology

·    Orange pest and pest damage

·    Orange pest control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

 

 

No. Specific Learning Outcome Topics Subtopics Time Estimation References
6 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of tea plant phenology  and  tea pests, pest damages and pest controls. Tea plant phenolo-gy, tea pests, pest damage and pest control. ·    Tea plant phenology

·    Tea pest and diseases damage

·    Tea diseases control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

7 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of medicinal and spice plants (pepper, clove, nutmeg, etc.) phenology, important pests, pest damages and pest controls. Medicinal and spice plant phenology, pests, pest damage, and pest control. ·    Medicinal and spice plant phenology

·    Medicinal and spice pests and pest damage

·    Medicinal and spice pest control

 

30 minutes

 

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

8 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of coconut plant phenology,  diseases, pathogens, damages and disease controls. Relationship among coconut plant phenology, diseases, damage, and disease control. ·    Coconut and other Palmae plant phenology

·    Coconut diseases and disease damage

·    Coconut disease control

 

30 minutes

 

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

9 After completing this topic, students will be able to ex-plain the relation of cacao plant phenology,  diseases, pathogens, damage and diseases controls. Cacao plant phenology and diseases, damage and control. ·    Cacao plant phenology

·    Cacao pest and diseases damage

·    Cacao diseases control

 

30 minutes

40 minutes

 

30 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

No. Specific Learning Outcome Topics Subtopics Time Estimation References
10 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of coffee plant phenology, diseases, pathogens, damage and disease controls. Coffee plant phenology and diseases, damage and control. ·    Coffee plant phenology

·    Coffee diseases and diseases damage

·    Coffee diseases control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

 
11 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of rubber plant phenology, diseases, pathogens, damage and disease controls. Rubber plant phenology and diseases, damage and control. ·    Rubber plant phenology

·    Rubber diseases and diseases damage

·    Rubber diseases control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

 
12 After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of orange plant phenology,  diseases, pathogens, damage and disease controls. Orange plant phenology and diseases, damage and control. ·    Orange plant phenology

·    Orange diseases and diseases damage

·    Orange diseases control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

13. After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of medicinal and spice plants (pepper, clove, nutmeg, etc.) phenology, important diseases, pathogens, damages and disease controls. Tea plant phenology and diseases, damage and control. ·    Tea plant phenology

·    Tea diseases and diseases damage

·    Tea diseases control

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

 

40 minutes

14. After completing this topic, students will be able to explain the relation of medicinal and spice plants (pepper, clove, nutmeg, etc.) phenology, important diseases, pathogens, damages and disease

controls.

Medicinal and spice plant phenology, diseases, pathogens damage and control. ·    Medicinal and spice plant phenology

·    Medicinal and spice diseases and diseases damage

·    Medicinal and spice diseases control

 

30 minutes

 

30 minutes

 

 

40 minutes


Major References:

 

  1. Blackman RL and Eastop VF.   Aphids on the World’s Crops : An Identification Guide.  John Wiley & Sons.  Singapore.
  2. Direktorat Bina Perlindungan Tanaman. Direktorat Jenderal Pertanian Tanaman Pangan.    Pengelolaan Organisme Pengganggu Tumbuhan Terpadu pada Tanaman Kubis.  Jakarta.
  3. Kalshoven LGE.   Pests of Crops in Indonesia.  PT Ichtiar Baru – Van Hoeve, Jakarta.
  4. Lewis T.   Thrips as Crop Pests.  CAB International.  Wallingford, UK.
  5. Pirone PP.   Pests and Diseases of Ornamental Plants.  The Ronald Press Co.  New York.
  6. Priyambodo S.   Pengendalian Hama Tikus Terpadu.  Seri PHT.  Penebar Swadaya, Jakarta.  135 p.
  7. Semangoen H.   Penyakit-penyakit Tanaman Hortikultura di Indonesia.  Gadjah Mada University Press.
  8. Semangoen H.   Penyakit-penyakit Tanaman Perkebunan di Indonesia.  Gadjah Mada University Press.

 

Teaching Learning Strategy :

 

Delivery of course topics will be done through lectures followed by discussion.  Students are expected to discuss actively, not only with the instructor, but also among students.  Discussions will be any topics related to course materials and its implementation in the field.  In laboratory works, students conducting assignments: observing insect and disease or pathogen specimens, Doing some field trips observing and discussing about pests and diseases of the perennial plants Observing result from those field trips are presented and discussed in class.

 

Assignments :

 

This course has two course assignments in Middle Semester Exam (MSE) and Final Semester Exam (FSE), two course practical assignments, and weekly practical work reports.

 

Evaluation of Student’s Performance (Grading)          :

 

Evaluation of student’s performance conducted through written examination (mid semester and final exam), laboratory work examination, and special assignments.  Percentages of those components for final grade are as follow :

 

Component Percentage (%)
Mid-semester exam

Final exam

Laboratory work

Special assignment

35

35

20

10

 

Category of Grading (Evaluation of Student Performance)

 

Range of Scores Grade
x ? 80

70 ? x > 80

60 ? x 70

50 ? x 60

x < 50

A

B

C

D

E

 

Schedule of Class Meeting (Lecture)

 

Week Topic
1. Coconut and other palmae plant phenology, coconut pests and pest damage, and coconut pest control
2. Cacao plant phenology, cacao pests and pest damage, and cacao pest control
3. Coffee plant phenology, coffee pests, pest damages, and cacao pest control
4. Rubber plant phenology, rubber pests and pest damage, and rubber pest control

 

5. Orange plant phenology, cacao pests and pest damage, and cacao pest control
6. Tea plant phenology, tea pests, pest damages, and tea pest control
7. Medicinal and spice plants (pepper, clove, nutmeg, etc.)  plant phenology, pests, pest damages, and tea pest control
8. Midterm Exam
9 Coconut and other palmae plant phenology, coconut diseases, damage, and coconut disease control
10. Cacao plant phenology, cacao diseases, damage, and cacao disease control
11. Coffee plant phenology, coffee diseases, damage, and coffee disease control
12. Rubber plant phenology, rubber diseases, damage, and rubber disease control
13. Orange plant phenology, orange diseases, damage, and orange disease control
14. Tea plant phenology, tea diseases, damage, and tea disease control
15. Medicinal and spice plants (pepper, clove, nutmeg, etc.)  plant phenology, medicinal and spice  diseases, damage, and Medicinal and spice p disease control
16. Final Exam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Pesticide Use and Management (PTN 306)

 

 

Credit                              :  3 (2 for lecture and 1 for laboratory exercises)

Semester                         :  6

Prerequisite                    :  PTN 212 and PTN 222, or PTN 200

Instructors                     :  Prof. Dr. Ir. Dadang, Dr. Ir. Abdul Muin Adnan

Dr. Ir. Abjad Asih Nawangsih, Ir. Djoko Prijono,

Ir. Djoko Prijono, MAgrSc.

Number of Students      :  80

 

The Importance of Course

After completing this course, the students will get knowledge in the following aspects:

  • Understanding the terminology of pesticides and the roles of pesticides in agriculture systems;
  • Understanding the legal aspects in pesticide use, regulation of pesticides and marketing;
  • Understanding the physicochemical and biological properties of pesticides in relation to safe handling pesticides and the efficacy of pesticides;
  • Understanding the mode of action of pesticides based on different chemical groups and target organism groups;
  • Understanding the techniques of pesticide application in order to optimize the application of pesticides;
  • Understanding the management of safe handling of pesticides in transport, preparation, application, disposal and storage;
  • Evaluation of pesticide application either physical, biological or environmental aspects;
  • Understanding the side effects of improper use of pesticides on agriculture ecosystems.

 

Course Description

 

This course discusses the roles of pesticides in agriculture system, general terminology of pesticide, formulation, physicochemical and biological properties of pesticides, classification of pesticides based on chemical compounds, targets, and mode of actions, mode of actions of pesticides and pesticide degradation, techniques of pesticide application, pesticide application equipments and their calibration methods, optimizing pesticide application, management of pesticide in relation to safe handling in transport, preparation, application, disposal and storage, side effects of pesticide use on ecosystem, problems and management of pest and pathogen resistance to pesticides.

 

General Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, the students will be able to explain the terminology of pesticides and their role in agricultural systems,  modes of action of pesticides, toxicological aspects, techniques of pesticide application, optimizing pesticide application,  management of pesticides and side effects of pesticide use on ecosystem.

 

Organization of Course Topics

INSTRUCTIONAL ANALYSIS

PESTICIDE USE AND MANAGEMENT

(PTN 304)

Explaining the terminology of pesticides and pesticide formulation, history and development, roles in agriculture systems, and pesticide regulation
Explaining the pesticides classification, physicochemical, toxicological aspects of pesticide
Explaining mode of action of insecticide
Explaining mode of action of phytopathocide
Explaining pesticide application equipments
Explaining pesticide application techniques
Explaining the optimizing the use of pesticide application techniques
Explaining the side effects of improper use of pesticides on ecosystem application techniques
Pesticide management from transport to disposal
GLO : After completing this course, the students will be able to explain the terminology of pesticide and their role in agricultural system, modes of action of pesticides, toxicological aspects, techniques and equipment of pesticide application, optimization in pesticide application, management of pesticides and side effects of pesticide use on system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Week Specific learning outcome Main topic Sub topic Time estimation References
1 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the roles of pesticides in agriculture system, terminology of pesticide and pesticide formulations

 

· Role of pesticides in Agriculture,  terminology  of pesticides and formulation

 

1.1.  Course contract

1.2.  Terminology of pesticide

1.3.  Roles of pesticide in agriculture system

1.4.  Pesticides in integrated pest         management

1.5.  Pesticide regulation and registration

1.6.  History of pesticide development and marketing

1.7.  Pesticide formulation

10 minutes

10 minutes

15 minutes

 

15 minutes

 

15 minutes

 

15 minutes

 

20 minutes

3, 20, 30, 34, 35

 

 

2 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the toxicological aspects of pesticides and the classification of pesticides · Toxicological aspects of pesticide   and classification of pesticides 2.1.  Physicochemical properties of pesticides (insecticides)

2.2.  Concept of dose and concentration

2.3.  Interaction between  dose/ concentration and response (LD, LC, etc)

2.4.  Point of entry of insecticides

2.5.  Metabolism of insecticide

2.6.  Classification based on chemical compounds, targets, ormulations, and mode of action

20 minutes

 

15 minutes

 

15 minutes

 

 

15 minutes

20 minutes

15 minutes

3, 8, 12, 14, 30, 34

 

 Specific Learning Outcomes

 

Week Specific learning outcome Main topic Sub topic Time estimation References
3 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the insecticides interfering with central nervous  system Insecticides interferring with central nervous systems 3.1.  Affecting cethylcholinesterase

3.2.  Affecting ion channels

3.3.  Affecting other receptors in CNS

40 minutes

 

30 minutes

30 minutes

3, 9, 10, 30, 34

 

4 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the insecticides interferring with  hormonal and respiration systems and insect behavior Insecticides interferring with hormonal and respiration systems, and insect behavior 4.1.  Affecting hormonal system

4.2.  Affecting respiration system

4.3.  Affecting insect behavior

4.3.  Synergists

25 minutes

20 minutes

40 minutes

15 minutes

9, 30, 34

 

5 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the biological and botanical insecticides Biological and botanical insecticides

 

5.1.  Concept in searching for novel and safer insecticide

5.2.  Biological insecticides

5.3.  Botanical insecticides

25 minutes

 

40 minutes

35 minutes

7, 10, 11, 15, 24,  29, 30, 34

 

6. After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the terminology and roles of phytopatho-cide, and development of phytopathocide Terminology, and roles of phytopatho-cide, and develop-ment of phytopa-thocide 6.1  Terminology of phytopathocide

6.2. The roles of phytopathocide

6.3. Development and market of

Phytopathocide

15 minutes

 

30 minutes

55 minutes

 

1, 16, 27, 36

 

7. After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  fungicide, mode of action, application techni-ques, and resistance Fungicide, mode of action, application techniques, and resistance 7.1.  Classification of fungicide

7.2.  Modes of action of fungicide

7.3.  Application techniques of        funghicide

7.4. Resistance to pathogen

25 minutes

25 minutes

30 minutes

 

20 minutes

18, 19, 27

 

 

 

Week Specific learning outcome Main topic Sub topic Time estimation References
8 MID-SEMESTER EXAMINATION
9 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  resistance risk, management of resistance, natural fungicide and biological agents Resistence risk, management of resistance, natural fungicide and biological agents 9.1. Resistence risk

9.2. Management of resistance

9.3. Natural fungicides

9.4. Secondary metabolite and

biological fungicides

20 minutes

20 minutes

20 minutes

40 minutes

16, 21, 33, 36

 

10 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain Bactericide and nematicide, their role and use Introduction to actericide and nematicide, their role and use 10.1. Introduction of bactericide

10.2. Introduction of nematicide

10.3. Botanical and biological          nematicides

10.4. Management and application techniques

15 minutes

15 minutes

40 minutes

 

30 minutes

16, 21, 23, 31

 

11 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  types of pesticide application equipment Types of pesticide application equipment (spray equipment) 11.1.  Nozzle and droplet

11.2.  Pesticide application equipments

11.3.  Calibartion

11.4.  Sources of pesticide leak

11.5.  Spray  equipment maintaince

100 menit 2, 3, 4, 23

 

12 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the optimizing in pesticide use and good pesticide application techniques

Optimizing in pesticide use and good  pesticide application techniques

12.1.  Techniques of insecticide application

12.2.  Optimizing pesticide application

12.3 . Factors affecting in pesticide application

12.4.  Evaluation of pesticide

Application

25 minutes

 

40 minutes

 

20 minutes

 

15 minutes

2, 3, 4, 23

 

 

Week Specific learning outcome Main topic Sub topic Time estimation References
13 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the handling in transport, storage, and disposal of pesticides Pesticide handling in transport,  storage, and disposal of pesticides 13.1.  Safe handling in transport

13.2.  Safe handling in pesticide           preparation

13.3.  Safe handling in pesticide           application (spills)

13.4.  Safe handling in pesticide disposal

13.5.  Safe handling in pesticide storage

15 minutes

25 minutes

 

25 minutes

 

15 minutes

 

10 minutes

3, 5, 8

 

4 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the side-effects of improper use of insecticide (pesticides), part I Side-effects of improper use of  insecticide to insect pests and plant crops

 

14.1.  Resistance

14.2.  Resourgence

14.3.  Pesticide residues

14.4.  Phytotoxic effect

25 minutes

20 minutes

30 minutes

25 minutes

13, 17, 28, 30, 34

 

15 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain the side-effects of improper use of insecticide (pesticides), part II Side-effects of improper use of insecticide to beneficial organisms, humans, and environment 15.1.  Impact to predators, arasitoids, pollinators, and other arthropods

15.2.  Symptons of pesticide poisoning to humans

15.3.  Cronic and acute poisons

15.4.  Translocation and degradation of pesticides

15.5.  Pesticide in terrestrial

eviron- ments

15.6.  Pesticide in aquatic environments

15 minutes

 

 

20 minutes

 

15 minutes

20 minutes

 

15 minutes

 

15 minutes

3, 6, 22, 28, 30, 32, 34,

 

16 FINAL EXAMINATION


References:

 

  1. Agrios GN. 1997.  Plant Pathology.  Ac. Press.  London
  2. Akesson NB, Yates WE. 1979.  Pesticide Application Equipment and Techniques.  FAO of The UN.  Rome
  3. Anonymous. 1994.  Agro-Pesticides, Properties and Fuctions in Integrated Crop Protection.  ESCAP-UN.
  4. Anonymous. 2004.  Manual for Field Trials in Crop Protection.. Syngenta International.
  5. Anonymous. 2005.  International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides.  FAO of the UN.  Rome
  6. Atreya N, Billington R. (Editors). 2000.  Human Exposure to Pesticide Residues, Natural Toxins and GMOs, Real and Perceived Risks.  British   Crop Protection Council.  UK
  7. Baker DR, Umetsu NK (eds). 2000.  Agrochemical Discovery; Insects, Weeds and Fungal Control.  ACS.  Washington DC.
  8. Banks A, Broadley R, Collinge M, Middleton K.  1990.  Pesticide Application Manual.  Queensland Department of Primary Industries.  Brisbane
  9. Corbett JR, Wright K, Baillie AC. 1984.  The Biochemical Mode of Action of Pesticides.  Academic Press.  New York.

10  Copping LG, Hewitt HG.  1998.  Chemistry and Mode of Action of Crop Protection Agents.  The Royal Society of Chemistry.  UK

  1. Dev S, Koul O. 1997. Insecticides of Natural Origin.  Harwood Academic Publishers.  UK
  2. Devisetty BN, Chasin DG, Berger PD. 1993. Pesticide Formulations and Application Systems.  ASTM.  Philadelphia
  3. Fong WG, Moye HA, Seiber JN, Toth JP. 1999. Pesticide Residues in Foods, Methods, Techniques, and Regulations.  John Wiley& Sons.  NY
  4. Foy CL, Pritchard DW. 1996. Pesticide Formulation and Adjuvant Technology.  CRC Press. New York
  5. Hall FR, Menn JJ. 1984. Biopesticides, Use and Delivery.  Humana Press.  New Jersey
  6. Hague NGM, Gowen SR. 1987. Chemical Control of Nematodes. In Brown RH, Kerry BL (eds) Principles and Practice of Nematode Control in Crops.  Academic Press.  Sydney
  7. Hamiltons D, Crossley S. (Editors). 2004. Pesticide Residues in Food and Drinking Water: Human Exposure and Risks.  John Wiley & Sons.              England
  8. Hewitt HG. 1998. Fungicides in Crop Protection.  Oxon:  CABI. UK
  9. Horfol JG. 1956. Principles of Fungicide Action.
  10. Garner W, Royal P, Liem F. 1999. International pesticide Product Registration requirements.  ACS.  Washington DC
  11. Jatala P. 1985. Biological control of nematodes in Sasser JN, Carter CC.  An advanced Treatise on Meloidogyne Vol. I: Biology and Control.  North Caroline State University Graphies.
  12. Kaloyanova F, El Batawi MA. 1991. Human Toxicology of Pesticides.  CRC.  London
  13. Kerry BR. 1987. Biological Control In Brown RH, Kerry BR (eds).  Principle and Practice of Nematode Control in Crops.  Academic Press.  NY

24  Kuhr RJ, Motoyama N.  1998.  Pesticide and the Future; Minimizing Chronic Exposure of Humans and the Environment.  IOS Press.  Netherlands.

  1. Matthews GA, Histop EC. 1993. Application Technology for Crop Protection.  CAB International.  UK
  2. Mueller F, editor. 2000. Agrochemicals:  Composition, Production, Toxicology, Applications.  Weinheim:  Wiley – VHC.
  3. Nene YL, Thapliyal PN. 1971. Fungicides in Plant Diseases.  Oxofrd & IBH Publishing Co.  New Delhi
  4. Pesticide Asian Network. 1995. Pesticides in tropical Agriculture, Hazards and Alternatives.  Margrf Verlag.  The Netherlands.
  5. Prakash A, Rao J. 1996. Botanical Pesticides in Agriculture.  CRC Lewis Publishers.  New York.
  6. Perry AS, Yamamoto I, Ishaaya I, Perry RY. 1998. Insecticides in Agriculture and Environment:  Retrospects and Prospects.  Springer Berlin:
  7. Saxena G, Mukerji KG. 1988. Biologiocal control of nematodes In Mukerji KG, Garg KL (Eds).  Biocontrol of Plant Diseases. Vol. I.            CRC Press.  Florida.
  8. Schnoor JL. (Editors). 1991.  fate of Pesticides and Chemicals in the Environment.  John Wiley & Sons.  New York
  9. Sekizawa Y, Wakabayasi K. 1990. Bactericides. In Klement Z, Rudolph K, Sands DC (Eds).  Methods in Bacteriology.  Akademiai Kiado.  Budapest
  10. Stenersen J. 2004. Chemical pesticides, Mode of action and toxicology.  CRC, Washington DC.
  11. Van Emden HF, Peakall DB. 1996. Beyond Silent Spring, Integrated Pest management and Chemical Safety.  Chapman and Hall.  UK
  12. Wain RL, Carter A. 1977. Nomenclature and definitions, In Mars W (Eds) Systemic Fungicides.  Longman Group Ltd.  New York

 

 

 

Specific Learning Outcomes for Laboratory Exercise

Week Topic Sub Topic Time estimation References
1 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the classification of pesticides, pesticide formulations, dose/concentration and pesticide label.

 

–  Explanation of general rules in laboratory

–  activity (attendance, report, examination)

–  Classification of pesticides based on    targets and formulations

–  Formulation stability

–  Dose and concentration

–  Examination of pesticide label

150 minutes 1, 4, 5

 

2 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  and calculate probit analysis – Concept of interaction dose/concen-tration and  response

– Determination of LD50 or LC50 values

150 minutes 5
3 After attending this session, the students will be able to conduct the test of contact poison of insecticides – Topical application test

– Residual effect test

150 minutes 5
4 After attending this session, the students will be able to conduct the test of stomach poison of insecticides – Sandwich method test

– Dipping method test

150 minutes 5
5 After attending this session, the students will be able to conduct the test of systemic, fumigant poison and insect growth regulator – Systemic method test

– Fumigant method test

– Test of insect growth regulator

150 minutes 5

 

 

 

 

Week Topic Sub Topic Time estimation References
6 After attending this session, the students will be able to conduct the test of behaviour effect of insecticides – Antifeedant

– Antioviposition

150 minutes 5
7 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the use of pesticide by farmers and market of pesticide –   Survey of pesticide use and market

 

150 minutes
8 MID-EXAM
9 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the component of sprayer especially nozzle – Introduction of nozzle types

– Calibration

150 minutes 1, 2, 4

 

10 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the type of pesticide application equipments –  Introduction of types of pesticide application equipment and their assesories 150 minutes 1, 4

 

11 After attending this session, the students will be able to spray pesticide properly – Application of pesticide on farmer field 150 minutes 1, 4

 

12 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the test method of fungicide to fungi – Fungicide test to development of fungi coloni in vitro and in vivo

– Nematicide test to mortality in vitro and infection rate in vivo

150 minutes 3
13 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the fungicide test to conidial germination – Fungicide test on conidial germination, calculation and observation of conidia affected by fungicide 150 minutes 3

 

 

 

 

Week Topic Sub Topic Time estimation References
14 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  the test fungicide to post harvest pathogens – Fungicide test to post harvest pathogents in vivo 150 minutes 3
15 After attending this session, the students will be able to explain  and analyses data of fungicide and nematicide efficacy tests – determination of  LC50 – LC90  values 150 minutes 3
16 FINAL-EXAM


Major References

 

  1. Anonymous. 1994.  Agro-Pesticides, Properties and Fuctions in Integrated Crop Protection.  ESCAP-UN.
  2. Anonymous. 2004.  Manual for Field Trials in Crop Protection.. Syngenta International.
  3. Mueller F, editor. 2000.  Agrochemicals:  Composition, Production, Toxicology, Applications.  Weinheim:  Wiley – VHC.
  4. Matthews GA, Histop EC. 1993.  Application Technology for Crop Protection.  CAB International.  UK
  5. Perry AS, Yamamoto I, Ishaaya I, Perry RY. 1998.  Insecticides in Agriculture and Environment:  Retrospects and Prospects.  Springer.  Berlin.
  6. Prijono D. 1988.  Pengujian Insektisida, Penuntun Praktikum.  Jurusan Hama dan Penyakit Tumbuhan Faperta IPB.  Bogor

 

Teaching-Learning Strategy

 

In each class meeting, delivery of course topics will be done through lectures based on student centered learning.  The students will be asked to be active in discussion.  Quiz will be given at least three times to evaluate the student ability in catching topic of course delivered.  Quiz is not only in writing test but also in fun games.  In one of class meeting, guest speaker (pesticide company, agro businessman, farmers, etc.) will be invited to deliver certain or related topic of course (marketing, safe handling of pesticide, pesticide application).

 

Assignments

 

In complementing lectures, each group of students is required to complete the following assignments in practical work:

  • Weekly report of laboratory exercises
  • Paper as a result of survey

 

Evaluation of Student’s Performance

 

  • Weighting of student’s grade components
Component Weight (%)
Mid-semester exam 30
Final examination 30
Practical work (weekly assignments and exam) 30
Other assignments 10
  • Category of grading :
Range of scores Grade
x (score) ³ 80 A
               65 £ x < 80 B
55 £ x < 65 C
45 £ x < 55 D
x < 45 E

Schedule of Class Meeting (Lecture) 

 

Week 1:   Introduction: course contract; role of pesticides in integrated agriculture system, terminology of pesticides and formulation

Week 2:   Toxicological aspects of pesticide and classification of pesticides

Week 3:   Insecticides interferring with central nervous systems

Week 4:   Insecticides interferring with hormonal and respiration systems, effects and insect behavior

Week 5:   Biological and botanical insecticides

Week 6:   Terminology, and roles of phytopathocide, and development of phytopathocide

Week 7:   Fungicide, mode of action, application techniques, and resistance

Week 8;   Midterm exam

Week 9:   Resistence risk, management of resistance, natural fungicide and biological agents

Week 10: Introduction to bactericide and nematicide, their role and use

Week 11: Types of pesticide application equipment (spray equipment)

Week 12: Optimizing in pesticide use and good pesticide application techniques

Week 13: Pesticide handling in transport, storage, and disposal of pesticides

Week 14: Side-effects of improper use of insecticide to insect pests and plant crops

Week 15: Side-effects of improper use of insecticide to beneficial organisms, humans, and environment

Week 16; Final exam

 

 

  1. Pets and Disease of Food Croops and Horticulture (PTN 307)

 

Course credit (SKS)        :  4 (3-1) (2 credits for lecture, 1 credit for presentation, and 1 credit for laboratory exercise)

Offered in                         :  Odd semester

Prerequisite                      :  Principles of Crop Protection (PTN200)

Course Coordinator        :  Ir. DjokoPrijono, MAgrSc.

Language                          :      Indonesian          English       RBoth

 

Description of the course:

This course discusses the management of important pests and diseases of food and horticultural crops by considering the plant phenology; various important pests and diseases; distribution and their economic importance; pest biology; causal agents of plant disease and their epidemiology; interaction between pests and their environment; methods of control of pests and diseases of food and horticultural crops. Laboratory exercises: Observation of important pests of food and horticultural crops, their morphological characteristics and symptoms of damage on plants; symptoms and signs of important diseases of food and horticultural crops and morphological characteristics of the causal organisms.

 

Learning outcomes:

After completing the course, the students will be able to identify pest and disease problems on food and horticultural crops in relation to plant phenology, explain their bioecology and economic importance, assess their damage on plants, as well as formulate their control measures.

 

Contact hours        :  2 x 50 minutes for lecture (2 credits), 1 x 50 minute for presentation,  and 3 x 50 minutes for laboratory exercise (1 credit) per week

 

Learning method

Lecture and discussion (2 h/wk), presentation (1 h/wk), laboratory practicum (3 h/wk)

 

Course schedule (class meeting, 2 x 50 min each)

 

Week 1: Major pests of rice

Week 2: Major pests of corn, cassava, and sweetpotato

Week 3: Major pests of soybean, mungbean, and groundnut

Week 4: Major pests of crucifers and shallot family

Week 5: Major pests of potato, tomato, and chilli

Week 6: Major pests of citrus, banana, and mangosteen

Week 7: Major pests of papaya, mango, and ornamental plants

Week 8 & 9:  Midsemester exam period

Week 10: General disease 1

Week 11: General disease 2

Week 12: Major diseases of food crops (rice, corn, soybeam, cassava, sweetpotato, groundnut)

Week 13: Major diseases of vegetable crops 1 (shallot, onion, etc.)

Week 14: Major diseases of vegetable crops 2 (chilli, potato, celery, carrot) and ornamental plants (chrysanthemum, rose)

Week 15:Major diseases of fruit crops 1 (citrus, mangosteen, durian)

Week 16: Major diseases of fruit crops 2 (papaya, banana)

 

Schedule for presentation and laboratory exercises will arranged in accordance with course schedule.

 

Indicative assessment:

Mid-term exam                                      25%

Final semester exam                              25%

Presentation                                            25%

Laboratory exercise                                25%

 

Component of laboratory exercise

Laboratory exercise report       40%

Laboratory exercise exams       40%

Laboratory exercise quizzes     10%

Field trip report                         10%

 

 

 

Grading

x ? 80                 A

75 ? x < 80         AB

70 ? x < 75         B

65 ? x < 70         BC

55 ? x < 65         C

45 ? x < 55         D

x< 45                  E (fail)

 

Reading:                

  1. Marwoto, Hardaningsih S, Taufiq A. 2013. Hama, Penyakit, danMasalah Hara padaTanamanKedelai: IdentifikasidanPengendaliannya. Bogor: Puslitbangtan.
  2. Syam M, Suparyono, Hermanto, Wuryandari D, penyunting. 2007. MasalahLapang Hama, Penyakit, Hara padaPadi. Bogor: Puslitbangtan.
  3. Muniappan R, Shepard BM, Carner G. 2012. Arthropod Pests of Horticultural Crops in Tropical Asia. Wallingford: CABI.
  4. Hill DS. 2008. Pests of Crops in Warmer Climates and Their Control. Berlin: Springer.
  5. Ames T, Smit NEJM, Braun AR, O’Sullivan JN, Skoglund LG. 1997. Sweetpotato: Major Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Disorders. Peru: International Potato Center.
  6. Parker BL, Talekar NS, Skinner M. 1995. Field Guide: Insect Pests of Selected Vegetables in Tropical and Subtropical Asia. Shanhua: AVRDC.
  7. Reissig WH, Heinrichs EA, Litsinger JA, Moody K, Fiedler L, Mew TW, Barrion AT. 1986. Illustrated Guide to Integrated Pest Management in Rice in Tropical Asia. Los Baños: IRRI.
  8. Kalshoven LGE. 1981. The Pests of Crops in Indonesia.Laan PA van der, translator. Jakarta: IchtiarBaru-van Hoeve. Translated from: De Plagen van de Cultuur-gewassen in Indonesië.
  9. Hill DS. 1975. Agricultural Insect Pests of the Tropics and Their Control. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ Pr.
  10. Pathak MD, Khan ZR. 1994. Insect Pests of Rice. Manila: IRRI.
  11. Plantwise Knowledge Bank, http://www.plantwise.org/KnowledgeBank/Home.aspx
  12. Rice Knowldege Bank IRRI, http://www.knowledgebank.irri.org

 

 

  1. Introduction to Biotechnology in Crop Protection (PTN 403)

 

Credit unit                 :  2 (2-0) (2 lecture-hours [2 x 50 minutes], no lab practical)

Semester                     :  6

Prerequisites              :  Mycology, Microbiology, Biology of Plant Pathogens

Instructors                 :  Dr. Sri Hendrastuti Hidayat, Dr. Purnama Hidayat,

   Dr. Gede Suastika, Dr. Giyanto, Dr. Endang Nurhayati,

Dr. R. Yayi Munara Kusumah

Number of students  :  80-100 students (in 2 parallel classes)

 

The Importance of Course

Biotechnology is an application of molecular biology in biology, agriculture, food science, and medicine. The most popular implementation of biotechnology is that associated with genetic engineering as well as cell and tissue culture technologies. This technology has been used widely, including in agriculture in the field of crop protection.  Students in agriculture should have a good knowledge and perspective toward the advantages and disadvantages of biotechnology for addressing the issue of food security and safety. Students majoring in plant protection should understand the role and importance of biotechnology for crop protection.

 

Course Description

This course gives some perspectives of basic molecular biology, and basic techniques on genetic manipulation with the emphasis on application of biotechnology in crop protection field of study.

 

General Learning Outcome

After completing this subject, students will understand the role of biotechnology in crop protection, i.e. as an important element in pest management strategy.

 

Specific Learning Outcomes

After attending this course, students will be able to explain  :

  • The basic genetics theory : cell structure, nucleic acid structure, replication and gene regulation
  • Basic genetic manipulation techniques : extraction of total DNA and RNA, cloning and genetic recombination
  • Genetic diversity of insect pests and plant pathogens
  • Biotechnology-based technique for pests and diseases diagnosis
  • Biotechnology-based technique for pests and diseases control : examples and their risks and management strategy.

 

Organization of Course Topics

The main goal of this course is to provide students with good perspectives on the application of biotechnology for plant pests and diseases management strategy. The course will begin with overview on basic genetics theory to remind students on the cell and genome concepts. This will include topics on replication, mutation, recombination, and genetic diversity which may occur on insect pests and plant pathogens.  Furthermore, the course will discuss basic molecular biology techniques and its application for dealing with plant pest and disease problems. Discussion on current practices in pest and disease management involving biotechnology will give students opportunities to explore and analyze the advantages and disadvantages of biotechnology in crop protection.

 

Teaching-Learning Strategy

Course topics will be delivered through interactive lecture format combining face-to-face lectures in class and active discussion. Discussion on specific cases will give students opportunities to better understand the principles and application of biotechnology in crop protection.

 

Schedule of Class Meeting (Lecture)

Week 1 Overview and definition
Week 2 History and milestones
Week 3 DNA/RNA structure, replication
Week 4 Protein structure, transcription and translation
Week 5

Overview: database management (GenBank)

Week 6 DNA barcoding
Week 7 Student discussion and presentation
Week 8 Midterm Exam
Week 9 Recombinant DNA technology
Week 10 Genetically-modified (GM) crops
Week 11 GM crops in plant protection
Week 12 GM crops risk assessment
Week13 Detection of plant pests & diseases: protein-based techniques
Week 14 Detection of plant pests & diseases: DNA-based techniques
Week 15 Detection of plant pests & diseases:  visualization of DNA
Week 16 Final Exam

 

Major References

 

Agrawal AA, Tuzun S, Bent E. 2000. Induced Plant Defenses against Pathogens and Herbivores.  St. Paul, Minnesota: APS Press.

Crute IR, Holub EB, Burdon JJ. 1999. The Gene-for-gene Relationship in Plant-Parasite Interactions. Wallingford: CAB International.

Hoy M.  Insect Molecular Genetics.

Huang JS. 2001. Plant Pathogenesis and Resistance. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Khachatourians GG et al. 2002. Transgenic Plants and Crops. New YorkL Marcel Dekker.

Turner PC et al. 2001. Molecular Biology. London: Bios Scientific Publishers.

 

Evaluation

Student’s performance will be graded based on his/her achievement in examinations and some assignments. Category of grades is as follows:

Range of score Grade
x (score) > 80 A
70 < x < 80 B
60 < x < 70 C
50 < x < 60 D
x < 50 E

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

 

  1. Course Name : Fundamentals of Landscape Architecture (ARL 200)

SKS                                  : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                        : Semester 3

Prerequisite                      : –

Course Coodinator         : Bambang Sulisyantara

Language                         :  ? Indonesia ? English ? both

Please tick (?) where applicable

 

Description of The Course :

This course explain and discuss theories and landscape design application, landscape design, landscape construction implementation and landscape management by understanding nature as background all human being activities and various constraints and their potentials in designing and landscape design.

 

Learning Outcomes :

After completing this course the student is able to describe the landscape as the background and the basis for a wide range of human activities, is able to explain the constraints in the planning process, and is able to creatively demonstrate the relationship of climate to the design, selection and analysis site, and is able to synergize the spatial aspect, social and visual necessary in understanding the dynamics of the landscape.

 

Indicative Assessment :

The criteria of assessment in this lecture are made by considering these components:

Scoring Presentation:

Midterm Exam =  30 %; Final Exam = 40 %; Practicum Tasks= 30 %

Score:  A  ³  80

75 ? AB < 80

70 ? B < 75

65?BC<70
60?C<65
50 ? D<60

E< 50

 

Contact Hours :

14xlectures @ (2X50 minus) ; 14xpractical classes @ (3×50 minutes)

 

 

Reading :

  • Simonds JO, Starke B. 2017. Landscape Architecture: A Manual of Site Planning and Design. McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York. 331 p
  • Carpenter PL, Walker TD, Lanphear FO. 1975. Plants in the Landscape. W.H. Freeman and Co: San Francisco. 481 p.
  • Laurie M. 1984. An Introduction to Landscape Architecture. Department of Architecture, University of California: Berkeley. 134 p.
  • Lyle, JT.1994. Regenerative Design for Sustainable Development. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. New York. 338p.
  • Parker, J. and P. Bryan. 1989. Landscape Management and Maintenance. Billing and Sons Limited. Worcester. 177p.
  • Walter, B., L. Arkin, and R. Crenshaw. 1993. Sustainable Cities Concepts and Strategies for Eco-city Development. Eco-home Media. Los Angeles. 354p.
  • Wekerley, G.R. and C. Whitzman. 1995. Safe Cities: Guidelines for Planning, Design, and Management. Van Nostran Reinhold. New York. 206p.
  • Hamm J. 1988. Drawing Scenery : Landscape and Seascape. The Berkley Publishing Group. New York.
  • Wilson, DA., and Wilson TJ. 2003. Planning and Designing Your Home Landscape. Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. Madison.
  • Dreisetl, H., and D. Grau. 2005. New Waterscapes : Planning, Building, And Designing With Water. Birkhäuser – Publishers for Architecture. Basel · Berlin · Boston.
  • Jeong, KY. 2006. Landscape Design Park. Archiworld Co. Ltd. Seoul, Korea.

 

 

  1. Course Name : Landscape for Agrotourism (ARL 315)

SKS                                  : 2 (2-0)

Offered in                        : Semester 4

Prerequisite                      : –

Course Coodinator         : Qodarian Pramukanto and Afra DN Makalew

Language                         :  ? Indonesia ? English ? both

Please tick (?) where applicable

 

Description of the couse :

This course explain and discuss term, definition, and classification of tourism in general and agrotourism; landscape or farm inventory and analysis, development plan and design to support agro recreation and tourism in small scale (home garden, village garden) and large scale (plantation). Field study, class discussion and class seminar, and type of exhibition are held to support planning and design studio work.

 

Learning outcomes :

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to describe, to identify and to classify varies type of recreation and tourism at agriculture area, element and factor that affect agrotourism activity and landscape; has an ability to plan and manage attractive, responsible and sustainable agrotourism area

 

Indicative Assessment :

The criteria of assessment in this lecture are made by considering these components:

Scoring Presentation:

Midterm Exam =  35 %; Final Exam = 35 %; Practicum Tasks= 30 %

 

Score:

A   ³ 80

75 ? AB < 80

70 ? B < 75

65?BC<70
60?C<65
50 ? D<60

E<50

 

Contact Hourse :

14xlectures @ (2X50 minutes) ; no practical class

 

Reading :

Major literatures

Gold, S.M. 1980. Recreation Planning and Design. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York

Gunn, C.A. 1997. Vacationscape: Developing Tourist Areas. Taylor & Francis. USA

________. 1999.  Tourism Planning.  Taylor & Francis, London

Holden, A. 2000. Environment & Tourism. Routledge , Taylor and Francis Group, London and New York

Some tourism journals and reports

Supporting literatures

Harris, C.W. dan N.T. Dines, 1988. Timesaver Standards for Landscape Architecture: Design and
Construction Data. McGraw Hill Book Co., New York.

Hill, W.F., 1995. Landscape Handbook for The Tropics. Garden Art Press. Sufflok, UK

 

  1. Course Name : Plant in the Landscape (ARL 320)

SKS                                  : 2 (2-0)

Offered in                        : Semester 5

Prerequisite                      : ARL 200

Course Coodinatore       : Nizar Nasrullah and Tati Budiarti

Language                         :  ? Indonesia ? English ? both

Please tick (?) where applicable

 

Description of the couse :

This course explain and discuss plant selection for landscape planting plan/design, definition of landscape plant, plant ecology, plant physical and ecological characteristics, various type of landscape plant, planting function on the landscape, plant characteristics on various type of landscape, planting plan.

 

Learning outcomes :

After completing  this couse, students will be able to explin the classification and naming of plnats, character morphology and ecology of plant, know keragam horticultural landscape that includes grasses and cover crop, shrubs, trees and climbing plant, resulting in a creative and innovative can be used in the preparation of plan cultivation.

 

Indicative Assessment :

The criteria of assessment in this lecture are made by considering these components:

Scoring Presentation:

Midterm Exam =  32,5 %; Final Exam = 32,5 %; Practicum Tasks= 35 %

Score:

A  ³  80

75 ? AB < 80

70 ? B  < 75

65?BC<70
60?C<65
50 ?  D <60

E< 50

 

Contact Hourse :

14xlectures @ (2X50 minus) ; 14xpractical classes @ (3×50 minutes)

 

Reading :

  1. Haskett, Bo. 1982. Planting Design. E.F.N Spon. London.
  2. Carpenter, P. L.,T. D. Walker, F. O. Lanphear. 1975. Plant in the Landscape. W. H. Freman and Company. San Francisco.
  3. Eckbo, G. 1968. Home Landscape Desaign. McGraw Hill Book Company. New York.
  4. Grey, G. W. and F. J. Deneke. 1984. Urban Forest. John Wiley And Sons. New York.
  5. E. Sternloff and R. Warren. 1984. Park and Recreation Maintenance. John Wiley and Sons. New York.
  6. Simond, J. O. and Starke 2006. Landscape Architecture. McGraw Hill. New York
  7. 2001. An Indonesian Institut of Science, Republic of Alphabetical List Plants Species Cultivated in Bogor. Botanical Garden.

 

  1. Course Name : Greenery Open Space (ARL 323)

SKS                                  : 2 (2-0)

Offered in                        : Semester 7

Prerequisite                      : –

Course Coodinatore       : Bambang Sulistyantara and Tati Budiarti

Language                         :  ? Indonesia ? English ? both

Please tick (?) where applicable

 

Description of the couse :

This course explain and discuss various type, function, and distribution of green open space and the green space unit in urban, rural and natural areas; and factors which affect those attributes such as ecological and natural factors, population density, uniqueness, government development program, etc. Planning, design and management technique are learned to produce green open space . This course include class discussions and seminars on some case study.

 

Learning outcomes :

After studying this couse the student is able to explain the value of teh interest and the role of green space in urban and rural areas, the technique of determining the amount and distribution of units of space greening, able to creatively analiyze the relationship between the factors thet influence it, such as the uniqueness of natural resources, population and direction regional development, as well as creative and innovative able to do the planning and design of green space.

 

Indicative Assessment :

The criteria of assessment in this lecture are made by considering these components:

Criteria of assessment Range of Score Proportion (%) Information
Practicum assessment:

Quiz

Skill and participation level

Practicum report

Oral presentatiom

 

0 – 100

60 – 100

60 – 100

60 – 100

 

5

5

15

5

 

Individual score

Individual score

Individual score, Group score

Lecture assessment:

Midterm exam

Final exam

 

0 – 100

0 – 100

 

30

40

 

Individual score

Individual score

Score of ARL 323;  3 (2-3) 100

 

Contact Hourse :

14xlectures @ (2X50 minus) ; 14xpractical classes @ (3×50 minutes)

Reading :

  1. Benedict M., McMahon E.T. 2010. Green Infrastructure: Smart Conservation for the 21st Century.  Sprawl Watch Clearinghouse Monograph Series. 32 pgs.
  2. Bloomberg M.R., Strickland C. 2011. NYC Green Infrastructure Plan. NYC Environmental Protection. 43 pgs.
  3. Bradshaw A., Hunt B., Walmsley T. 1995. E & FN SPON, London. 272 pgs
  4. Carpenter et al. Plant in The Landscape. New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company.
  5. City of Portland Watershed Services. 2008. Cost Benefit Evaluation of Ecoroof. ECONorthwest, Portland. 31 pgs.
  6. Community Forest Northwest for the Northwest Climate Change Partnership. 2011. Green Infrastructure to Combat Climate Change; A Framework for Action in Cheshire, Cumbria, Great Manchester, Lancashire and Merseyside. 62 pgs.
  7. De Brun C.T.F (edt.). 2007. The Economic Benefits of Land Conservation. The Trust for Public Land. 54 pgs
  8. Devuyst D. (edt). How Green Is the City?  Sustainability Assessment and the Management of Urban Environments. Columbia University Press. 457 pgs.
  9. European Commission Environment Directorate-General. 2010. Life Building Up Europe’s Green Infrastructure. Luxemburg Publication Office of the European Union.
  10. Foster J., Lowe A., Winkelman S. 2011. The Value of Green Infrastructure for Urban Climate Adaptation. The Center for Clean Air Policy. 34 pgs
  11. Gies E. 2006. The Health Benefits of Parks. The Trust for Public Land. 24 pgs.
  12. Gies E. 2009. Conservation: An Invetsment that Pays;The Economic Benefits of Park and Open Space. The Trust for Public Land. 29 pgs
  13. Girling C., Kellett R. 2005. Skinny Streets and Green Neighborhoods; Design for Environment and Community. Island Press, Washington. 175 pgs
  14. Groth P., Miller R., Nadkarni N., Riley M., Shoup L. 2008. Quantifying the Greenhouse Gas Benefits of Urban Parks. The Trust for Public Land. 36 pgs
  15. Harnik P. The Excellent City Park System: What Makes it Great and How eo Get There. The Trust for Public Land. 43 pgs.
  16. Harnik P. Welle B. 2009. Measuring the Economic Value of a City Park System. The Trust for Public Land. 16 pgs
  17. Harnik P. Welle B. 2009. Smart Collaboration: How Urban Parks Can Support Affordable Housing. The Trust for Public Land. 11 pgs.Laurie M. 1990. An Introduction to Landscape Architecture. NewYork (US): American Elseveir Publising Co. Ltd.
  18. Kahn M.E. 2006. Green Cities; Urban Growth and the Environment. Brookings Institution Press, Washington DC. 160 pgs
  19. McDonnell M., Hahs A.K., Breuste J.H. (edts). 2009. Ecology of Cities and Towns; A Comparative Approach. Cambridge University Press. 714 pgs.
  20. Natural England. 2009. Green Infrastructure Guidance. Www. Naturalengland.org.uk. 97 pgs
  21. Robinette GO. 1983. Landscape Planning for Energy Conservation. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.
  22. Sherer P.M. 2006. Benefits of Parks: Why America Needs More City Parks and Open Space. The Trust for Public Land. 32 pgs.
  23. Simonds, JO. 1983. Landscape Architecture. New York: Mc Graw-Hill Book Company.
  24. Thompson C.W. and Travlou P. 2007. Open Space: People Space. Taylor and Francis Inc. New York. 199 pgs
  25. Walker C. 1999. Partnerships for Parks: Lessons from the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Urban Parks Program. Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund. 26 pgs
  26. Weber T. Maryland’s Green Infrastructure Assessment: A Comprehensive Strategy for Land Conservation and Restoration. Maryland Departement of Natural Resources. 246 pgs.
  27. Williams W. 2008. The Economic Benefits of Green Infrastructure: Developing Key Tests for Evaluating the Benefits of Green Infrastructure. Natural Economy Nortwest. 32 pgs.

 

  1. Course Name : Landscape of Agriculture (ARL 330)

SKS                                  : 2 (2-0)

Offered in                        : Semester 5

Prerequisite                      : –

Course Coodinatore       : Wahju Qamara Mugnisjah and Hadi Susilo Arifin

Language                         :  ? Indonesia ? English ? both

Please tick (?) where applicable

 

Description of the couse :

This course exlain and discuss integrated agricultural land at rural as well as urban area, from hulu ke hilir at micro, meso and macro scale. Study on agroforestry, agrosilvopastoral, and agro silvo fishery on landscape scale are discussed on the basis pra-production, production, post production subsystem with concern to institutional, land resources, agriculture infrastructure, human resources and human culture aspects.

 

Learning outcomes :

After completing this couse, students are able to understand the agicultural landscape as a system that must be maintained for the welfare of human sustainability.

 

Indicative Assessment :

The criteria of assessment in this lecture are made by considering these components: Scoring Presentation:

Midterm Exam =  30 %; Final Exam = 40 %; Practicum Tasks= 30 %

 

Score:       A   ³ 80

75 ?  AB < 80

70 ?  B   < 75

65?BC<70
60?C<65
50 ? D<60

E< 50

 

Contact Hourse :

14xlectures @ (2X50 minus); no practical class

 

Reading :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Course Name : Planting Construction (ARL 331)

SKS                                  : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                        : Semester 6

Prerequisite                      : ARL 320

Course Coodinatore       : Nizar Nasrullah, Bambang Sulistyantara, and Tati Budiarti

Language                         :  ? Indonesia ? English ? both

Please tick (?) where applicable

 

Description of the couse :

This course explain and discuss the role of planting construction as part of landscape plan implementation, plant material spasification, plant material engineering, site modification for planting purposes, planting specification, planting on each landscape type, plant maintenance, plant and management plan.

 

Learning outcomes :

Upon successful completion  of this course student will be able to understand in structuring of planting design, planting implementation that equal to planting plan, planting design of turfgrass, trees, shrubs, climaber and ground cover plant, and understand to make plan and implementation of planting maintenance.

 

Indicative Assessment :

The criteria of assessment in this lecture are made by considering these components:

Scoring Presentation:

Midterm Exam =  32,5 %; Final Exam = 32,5 %; Practicum Tasks= 35 %

 

 

Score:

A  ³  80

75 ? AB < 80

70 ? B  < 75

65 ? BC< 70

60 ? C   <65

50 ?   D   <60

E< 50

 

Contact Hourse :

14xlectures @ (2X50 minus) ; 14xpractical classes @ (3×50 minutes)

 

Reading :

  1. Bear, J. B. 1982. Tuft Management for Golf Courses. Mac Millan Publishing company, NY.
  2. Carpenter, P.L., T.D. walker, F.O. Lanphear. 1975. Plant in Teh Landscape W. H. Freeman and Company. San Pranscisco.
  3. H and R. Macklenburg. 1981. Nursery Management Administration and Culture. Prentice Hall, inc. Englewood Cilffs, NY.
  4. Harris, C.W. and N.T. Dines. Times Saver for Landscape architecture. Mac Graw Hill. Inc 1988.
  5. Hartman and Caster. Plant Propagation.
  6. Philips, S.LS. and D. Mason. 1992. The complete Book of The Water Garden. Word Lock.
  7. R.E and R. Warren, 1984. Park and Recreation Maintenance Management. Jhon Wiley and Sons. NY.
  8. Strom, S. And K. Nathan 1993. Site Engginering for Landscape Architects. Sec. Ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  9. Turgeon, A. J. 1991. Turf Grass Management. Prentice Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, NY.

 

  1. Course Name : Landscape Management (ARL 421)

SKS                                  : 3 (2-1)

Offered in                        : Semester 7

Prerequisite                      : ARL 200

Course Coodinatore       : Hadi Susilo Arifin, Wahju Qamara Mugnisjah, Syartinilia

Wijaya, and Kaswanto

Language                         :  ? Indonesia ? English ? both

Please tick (?) where applicable

 

Description of the couse :

This subject discusses the principles of landscape management in addressing problems; landscape evaluation and develop management plans to achieve sustainable environmental conditions; to learn some ecological-economic-social-cultural approaches, problem analysis tools in managing the landscape; and examine critical/ strategic issues in the actual landscape management.

 

Learning outcomes :

After Completing this couse, students will be able to explain the potential, problems and evaluting the landscape using a variety of approaches and tools available, and can plan an ecological landscape management approach.

 

Indicative Assessment :

The criteria of assessment in this lecture are made by considering these components:

Scoring Presentation:

Midterm Exam =  35 %; Final Exam = 35 %; Practicum Tasks= 30 %

 

Score:

A  ³  80

75 ? AB < 80

70 ? B  < 75

65 ? BC< 70

55 ? C   <65

45 ?   D   <55

E<45

 

Contact Hourse :

14xlectures @ (2X50 minus) ; 14xpractical classes @ (3×50 minutes)

 

 

 

Reading :

 

Arifin, H.S. dan N.H.S. Arifin. 2005. Pemeliharaan Taman. Penebar Swadaya. Jakarta.

Carpenter, P.L.TD. Walker and F.O. Lanphear. 1975. Inthe The Landscape. W.H. Freeman & Co. San Francisco. 481.

Parker, J.and P. Bryan. 1989. Landscape Management and Maintenance. Billing and SonsLimited, Worcester. 177p.

Simonds, JO and Starke B. 2006. Landscape Architecture. A Manual of Site Palning and Design.Mcgraw-Hill Book Company. 331p.

Sternloff, R.E. and R. Warren. 1984. Park & Recreation Maintenence Management. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. New York, 326p.

Wekerle, G. R. and C. Whitzman. 1995. Sife Cities: Guidelines for Planning, Design and Management. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York. 206p

Up to date Scientific Joaunal/Bulletin: Landscape Research; Landscape and Urban Plnning;other Jaounals & Scientific Reports.

 

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